top of page

Support Group

Public·39 members

Discover the Secrets Behind The Beatles' Sound: Volume 1 (1961-1964)



The Beatles Recording Reference Manual: Volume 1: My Bonnie through Beatles For Sale (1961-1964) (12)




The Beatles are widely regarded as the most influential and successful band of all time. Their music has shaped generations of fans and artists, and their legacy continues to inspire and challenge. But how did they create their classic recordings? What were the techniques, equipment, and influences behind their sound? And how did they evolve from a struggling rock 'n' roll group to a global phenomenon in just a few years?




The Beatles Recording Reference Manual: Volume 1: My Bonnie through Beatles For Sale (1961-1964) (12



In this article, we will review a book that answers these questions and more. The book is called The Beatles Recording Reference Manual: Volume 1: My Bonnie through Beatles For Sale (1961-1964) (12 by Jerry Hammack. It is the first book of a series that tracks the evolution of the band from their earliest recordings and initial hits, through Please Please Me, With The Beatles, A Hard Day's Night, and Beatles For Sale. The book is based on extensive, fully-documented research, including hundreds of recordings, books, magazine articles, photos, film and video evidence, and interviews with key engineers who worked on the sessions. It provides a unique view into the making of the greatest recordings of all time.


If you are a fan of The Beatles, a musician, a producer, a recording engineer, or a student of music history, this book is for you. You will learn about the details of each recording session, from the first take to the final remix. You will discover how The Beatles experimented with different instruments, effects, and styles. You will also gain insight into their creative process, their influences, and their challenges.


In this article, we will give you an overview of each chapter of the book, highlighting some of the most interesting facts and findings. We will also share our opinion on why this book is a valuable and enjoyable read for anyone who loves The Beatles.


The Beatles' early recordings




The first chapter of the book covers the period from 1961 to 1962, when The Beatles were still an unknown band trying to make it in the music industry. They recorded several songs for different labels and producers, such as Tony Sheridan, Bert Kaempfert, Brian Epstein, Ron Richards, George Martin, and others. Some of these songs were released as singles or EPs under various names, such as The Beat Brothers, Tony Sheridan and The Beatles, or simply The Beatles. Some of them were never released or only surfaced decades later.


The book gives a detailed account of each recording session, including the date, location, personnel, equipment, songs, takes, mixes, edits, releases, and notes. It also provides background information on how The Beatles got involved with each project, what were their expectations and motivations, and how they interacted with the other people involved.


Some of the highlights of this chapter are:



  • The first known recording of The Beatles was made in Hamburg in June 1961. They backed up Tony Sheridan on a song called My Bonnie, which was released as a single in Germany by Polydor Records. The song became a hit in Hamburg and caught the attention of Brian Epstein, who later became their manager.



  • The first recording of The Beatles as a four-piece band (with Ringo Starr on drums) was made in London in September 1962. They recorded four songs for George Martin at EMI Studios (later known as Abbey Road Studios). One of them was Love Me Do, which was released as their first single in the UK by Parlophone Records. The song reached number 17 on the charts and marked the beginning of their rise to fame.



  • The first recording of The Beatles using four-track technology was made in London in November 1962. They recorded two songs for George Martin at EMI Studios, one of them being Please Please Me. The song was released as their second single in the UK by Parlophone Records and became their first number one hit. The song also impressed the American label Capitol Records, which agreed to release their records in the US.



Please Please Me




The second chapter of the book covers the making of The Beatles' debut album, Please Please Me, which was recorded and released in 1963. The album consisted of 14 songs, eight of them written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and six of them covers of songs by other artists. The album was recorded in a single day, on February 11, 1963, at EMI Studios, with George Martin as the producer and Norman Smith as the engineer.


The book gives a detailed account of each recording session, including the date, location, personnel, equipment, songs, takes, mixes, edits, releases, and notes. It also provides background information on how The Beatles chose the songs for the album, what were their influences and inspirations, and how they performed under pressure and fatigue.


Some of the highlights of this chapter are:



  • The Beatles recorded 10 songs in 10 hours, with only a few breaks and minimal overdubs. They performed live in the studio, with minimal separation between the instruments and vocals. They used mostly basic equipment, such as two guitars, a bass, a drum kit, a piano, a harmonica, and a few microphones. They captured the energy and excitement of their live shows, as well as their raw talent and charisma.



  • The Beatles recorded two songs that were originally intended for other artists. One of them was How Do You Do It?, which was written by Mitch Murray and suggested by George Martin as a potential hit for The Beatles. The Beatles reluctantly recorded it, but preferred their own song Please Please Me as their second single. The other one was Do You Want To Know A Secret?, which was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and given to Billy J. Kramer and The Dakotas, another band managed by Brian Epstein. The Beatles recorded it for their own album, with George Harrison on lead vocals.



  • The Beatles recorded one song that became a classic and a signature of their sound. It was Twist And Shout, which was written by Phil Medley and Bert Berns and originally recorded by The Isley Brothers. The Beatles recorded it as the last song of the day, with John Lennon on lead vocals. Lennon had a sore throat and sang with great passion and intensity, creating one of the most memorable vocal performances of all time. The song was released as the final track of the album and also as a single in some countries.



With The Beatles




The third chapter of the book covers the making of The Beatles' second album, With The Beatles, which was recorded and released in 1963. The album consisted of 14 songs, eight of them written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and six of them covers of songs by other artists. The album was recorded over several sessions between July and October 1963, at EMI Studios, with George Martin as the producer and Norman Smith as the engineer.


The book gives a detailed account of each recording session, including the date, location, personnel, equipment, songs, takes, mixes, edits, releases, and notes. It also provides background information on how The Beatles developed their sound and style on their second album, what were their challenges and achievements, and how they balanced their recording work with their touring and media commitments.


Some of the highlights of this chapter are:



  • The Beatles experimented with different instruments and effects on their second album. They used electric pianos, organs, clavinets, timpani, bongos, maracas, tambourines, handclaps, feedback, double tracking, echo, reverb, compression, equalization, panning, editing, splicing, looping, speeding up, slowing down, reversing, and fading out. They also introduced new instruments, such as a 12-string guitar, a harmonium, and a saxophone. They created a richer and more diverse sonic palette, reflecting their musical growth and ambition.



  • The Beatles recorded two songs that featured guest musicians on their second album. One of them was Till There Was You, which was written by Meredith Willson and originally from the musical The Music Man. The Beatles recorded it with George Martin on piano and a group of session musicians on violins, violas, cellos, and double bass. The other one was Money (That's What I Want), which was written by Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford and originally recorded by Barrett Strong. The Beatles recorded it with George Martin on piano and saxophonists from The Mike Cotton Sound.



  • The Beatles recorded one song that became a landmark in their career and in rock history. It was I Want To Hold Your Hand, which was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded as a single in October 1963. The song was released in the UK in November 1963 and became their fifth number one hit. The song was also released in the US in December 1963 and became their first number one hit there, sparking the phenomenon known as the British Invasion. The song was also included on the US version of With The Beatles, which was titled Meet The Beatles! and released in January 1964.



A Hard Day's Night




The fourth chapter of the book covers the making of The Beatles' third album, A Hard Day's Night, which was recorded and released in 1964. The album consisted of 13 songs, all of them written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The album was also the soundtrack of their first feature film of the same name, directed by Richard Lester. The album was recorded over several sessions between January and June 1964, at EMI Studios, with George Martin as the producer and Norman Smith as the engineer.


The book gives a detailed account of each recording session, including the date, location, personnel, equipment, songs, takes, mixes, edits, releases, and notes. It also provides background information on how The Beatles wrote and recorded songs for their film project, what were their influences and innovations, and how they coped with their increasing fame and workload.


Some of the highlights of this chapter are:



  • The Beatles wrote and recorded all original songs for their third album. They were the first rock band to do so, breaking the tradition of including covers of songs by other artists. They also wrote more diverse and sophisticated songs, exploring different genres, moods, themes, and perspectives. They demonstrated their versatility and creativity as songwriters and performers.



  • The Beatles used acoustic guitars more prominently on their third album. They used them for rhythm, lead, solo, and harmony parts. They also used them for different effects, such as strumming, picking, fingerpicking, muting, sliding, hammering, pulling, and detuning. They created a distinctive and dynamic acoustic sound, which contrasted and complemented their electric sound.



  • The Beatles recorded one song that became a milestone in their musical development and in pop music history. It was A Hard Day's Night, which was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded as the title track of the album and the film. The song was released as a single in July 1964 and became their sixth number one hit in the UK and their third number one hit in the US. The song featured a famous opening chord, played by George Harrison on a 12-string guitar, which created a powerful and unique sound. The song also featured a complex and catchy melody, a lively and tight rhythm, and a clever and witty lyric. The song was a perfect example of The Beatles' musical genius and charisma.



Beatles For Sale




The fifth chapter of the book covers the making of The Beatles' fourth album, Beatles For Sale, which was recorded and released in 1964. The album consisted of 14 songs, eight of them written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and six of them covers of songs by other artists. The album was recorded over several sessions between August and October 1964, at EMI Studios, with George Martin as the producer and Norman Smith as the engineer.


The book gives a detailed account of each recording session, including the date, location, personnel, equipment, songs, takes, mixes, edits, releases, and notes. It also provides background information on how The Beatles experimented with new sounds and styles on their fourth album, what were their influences and challenges, and how they reflected their personal and professional experiences.


Some of the highlights of this chapter are:



  • The Beatles recorded more covers than originals on their fourth album. They chose songs from different genres, such as rock 'n' roll, country, folk, blues, R&B, soul, and pop. They also chose songs from different eras, such as the 1950s, and the contemporary ones. They also chose songs from different artists, such as Chuck Berry, Carl Perkins, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, The Drifters, The Shirelles, and The Miracles. They paid tribute to their musical heroes and influences, as well as showcased their eclectic and diverse tastes.



  • The Beatles recorded more complex and mature songs on their fourth album. They used more chords, modulations, harmonies, and melodies. They also used more instruments, such as an electric piano, an organ, a harmonica, a tambourine, a cowbell, a glockenspiel, and a cello. They also used more effects, such as distortion, feedback, echo, reverb, compression, equalization, panning, editing, splicing, looping, speeding up, slowing down, reversing, fading in, and fading out. They created a more sophisticated and varied sonic landscape, reflecting their artistic growth and ambition.



  • The Beatles recorded more personal and emotional songs on their fourth album. They wrote about love, loneliness, frustration, anger, sadness, happiness, hope, and despair. They also wrote about their experiences as touring musicians, celebrities, and human beings. They expressed their feelings and thoughts with honesty and sincerity, as well as with humor and irony. They connected with their fans and listeners on a deeper level, revealing their vulnerability and authenticity.



Conclusion




In conclusion, The Beatles Recording Reference Manual: Volume 1: My Bonnie through Beatles For Sale (1961-1964) (12 by Jerry Hammack is a book that every Beatles fan should read. It is a book that provides a comprehensive and accurate account of how The Beatles created their classic recordings in their early years. It is a book that reveals the details of each recording session, from the first take to the final remix. It is a book that explains the techniques, equipment, and influences behind their sound. It is a book that traces the evolution of their sound and style from album to album. It is a book that fills an important gap left by all other Beatles books published to date.


This book is not only informative but also enjoyable to read. It is written in a clear and engaging style, with plenty of illustrations, diagrams, tables, charts, and graphs. It is organized in a logical and chronological order, with each chapter covering one album or period. It is also well-researched and well-documented, with hundreds of sources and references cited in the endnotes and bibliography.


If you love The Beatles and want to learn more about their music and history, this book is for you. You will discover new facts and insights that will enhance your appreciation and understanding of their recordings. You will also experience the thrill and excitement of being in the studio with them as they made musical history.


FAQs




Here are some common questions and answers about the book:



Q: Who is Jerry Hammack and why did he write this book?


  • A: Jerry Hammack is a Canadian-American musician, producer, recording engineer and author living in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He has been a fan of The Beatles since he was a child and has studied their music for decades. He decided to write this book because he wanted to share his knowledge and passion with other fans and to provide a definitive reference for anyone interested in The Beatles' recordings.



Q: How many volumes are there in the series?


  • A: There are four volumes in the series so far. The first one covers the period from 1961 to 1964. The second one covers the period from 1965 to 1966. The third one covers the period from 1967 to 1968. The fourth one covers the period from 1968 to 1970.



Q: Where can I buy the book?


  • A: You can buy the book online from Amazon or other online retailers. You can also buy it directly from the author's website: https://beatlesrecordingreferencemanuals.com/



Q: Is there an audiobook or an ebook version of the book?


  • A: No, there is no audiobook or ebook version of the book at the moment. The book is only available in paperback format.



Q: How can I contact the author?


  • A: You can contact the author by email at jerry@beatlesrecordingreferencemanuals.com or by using the contact form on his website: https://beatlesrecordingreferencemanuals.com/contact/



71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page